Upgrading Avaya 4602SW, 4610SW with SIP Firmware

The railway came by a load of Avaya 4602SW, 4602SW+ and 4610SW phones. All came with the standard H323 firmware and we have upgraded some to the Avaya SIP firmware and linked them to our Asterisk server.

The upgrade to SIP firmware needs a standard HTTP server (you can use TFTP if you wish) and does not require any special Avaya software or tools.

The Avaya phones use DHCP for their IP address and if the DHCP does not deliver a ‘FileServer’ address (i.e. the HTTP server address) they ask the user to enter the IP address of the HTTP server from the numeric keypad.

After doing this the phone goes to Command Mode where you can tell it that you want SIP signalling firmware. To do this press Mute-S-I-G-#   (that’s Mute-7-4-4-#) to go into the Signal Type setting and select SIP.

The phone now restarts and fetches various files from the HTTP server.
First the phone requests 46xxupgrade.scr from the HTTP server which is a script processed by the phone which allows the phone to work out what firmware images it needs based on the phone’s model, the phone’s current firmware and most importantly the ‘SIG’ Signal Type setting we just changed via Mute-S-I-G#. Then the phone requests the latest boot firmware (if needed) from the HTTP server and then request the latest application firmware from the HTTP server.
It takes a few reboots as each part is upgraded and once the firmware is upgraded the phone requests 46xxsettings.txt from the HTTP server. This is a config file where you put the SIP Server’s IP address. This was set to point to our Asterisk machine.
Our 46xxsettings.txt looks like this

SET DIALPLAN     xxxx
SET SIG 2
SET SIPDOMAIN    avaya.phone
SET SIPPROXYSRVR 192.168.1.68
SET SIPREGISTRAR 192.168.1.68
SET SIPSIGNAL 0

Some of these may not actually be needed.

 

Once 46xxsettings.txt has been loaded the phone asks for the SIP Extension Number and Password which have to match the entries in the Asterisk sip.conf file. Note that the password is digits only and limited to 8 digits.

The phone then registers with Asterisk and can start making and receiving calls.

 

 

Footnote – Avaya stopped doing firmware updates for these phones back in 2011 and they are all End-Of-Life. The support.avaya.com site does have excellent manuals and tutorials on what put in 46xxsettings.txt
The Avaya support page that describe the latest firmware download is broken. It tells you what the firmware versions are but the download link points to a folder on their FTP server that does not exist any more. Drop us a line if you need a copy.